Random Card of the Day


Monday, March 11, 2019

Year: 1960

Set: Liebig The Story of Coffee (Rate)

Card: #2 Hoofdsoorten en hun kweek


“ Ahh, the great Hoofdsoorten en hun kweek. Classic. ” -Tylergallo

“ I love coffee and wish this card was in English or there was an easy way to translate this card. As far as the card goes I still can't get into non-sports cards but this is one of the more interesting ones I have seen. The art is well done on the front. The back is bland but seems to have a lot of information on the subject. ” -davidhandberry

“ I can't tell if this is German or Dutch, but it's interesting. Coffee literally makes me sick but I am sure I would buy this if I ran across the card somewhere. ” -Billy Kingsley

“ Scan by Nigel Taylor ” -Kirbythedodger

“ Interesting card. ” -parsley24

“ I like it, and I can't really tell you why. I just do. ” -switzr1

“ Cool German or Dutch Non-Sport set. Interesting subject also. ” -captkirk42

“ Was this written by the Swedish Chef from the Muppets? ” -DocOso

“ There is something quite charming about this card and I don't know what it is. I like it. ” -YoRicha

“ Uh, sure. Why not? It is old so cool. I am sure the back says something interesting, I just have no idea what. There are actually two of these listed in collections, which I thought was cool. ” -muskie027

Additional Comments

Posted ByMessage

PapaG321

Posts: 636
Joined: Mar 2018

Monday, March 11, 2019 4:27 AMReply Quote Top Bottom Report

I'd be leaning tiwards Dutch on this one. Another one of those "quirky" but interesting sets.


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On the road again...!

Lea DeFoote

Posts: 803
Joined: Jul 2012

Monday, March 11, 2019 5:33 AMReply Quote Top Bottom Report

Google Translate detects "Hoofdsoorten en hun kweek" as Dutch, and tranlates it to English as "Main types and their breeding".

-Tom


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Ted Musgrave card collection 98.5% Complete: Cards Known: 1010, Cards Owned: 995

Perfection is not a static state of being.

cnangle

Posts: 864
Joined: Nov 2011

Monday, March 11, 2019 8:56 AMReply Quote Top Bottom Report

Liebig was a producer of "meat extract" (bouillon cubes). The process was invented in 1847 by Justus von Liebig and the product was distributed by the London based Liebig Company beginning in 1847. As a way of trying to convince European housewives to use the product, the company began advertising with trade cards in 1868. 

The company would continue to make trade cards until 1975, when they were bought by Brooke Bond. Liebig would end up producing over 11,000 sets of cards. Most of their sets consist of either 6 or 12 cards and they are known for their beautifull lithography. Their sets were distributed in 14 different countries and 14 different languages.


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My two-cents is worth slightly more than a penny.

-- Chad --

switzr1

Posts: 4686
Joined: Dec 2013

Monday, March 11, 2019 9:10 AMReply Quote Top Bottom Report

I read that as 1875, meaning 11,000 sets in 7 years. Still, 11,000 sets in 107 years is pretty insane in it's own right.  Panini and Topps have nothing on these guys!


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On vacation.  No trade offers until I get back please.

Billy Kingsley

Posts: 4608
Joined: Aug 2011

Monday, March 11, 2019 9:13 AMReply Quote Top Bottom Report

Wow! 11 thousand sets? I still have so much more to learn. The advertising trade cards are essentially trading cards, aren't they? I was under the impression that the hobby started in 1879, but the world of trade cards has always kind of eluded me; I know they exist, I know COMC sells them, but I don't really know anything more. I did photograph some in a museum, as well as Calling Cards- which seem like a cross between post cards and trading cards. I took several pictures, they start Here on my website. 


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Collect for the love of the hobby!

Writer of Cardboard History  & Nothing But Nets | My COMC- most under 75 cents!

New Collection Website: Cardboard History Gallery Shows my entire collection in albums for each person, team and set (Still under construction)

Tips on how to make your scans look like the card does in hand (No more washed out, fuzzy scans!):

 

cnangle

Posts: 864
Joined: Nov 2011

Monday, March 11, 2019 9:30 AMReply Quote Top Bottom Report

"No one is either so refined or so vulgar that he will not admire a pretty advertising card and save it." Qoute from "The Advertising Card Business" - May 1885

Here are two interesting articles about the rise of Trade Cards. 

Trade Cards An Illustrated History

The Development of the American Advertising Card

 


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My two-cents is worth slightly more than a penny.

-- Chad --

Billy Kingsley

Posts: 4608
Joined: Aug 2011

Monday, March 11, 2019 11:13 AMReply Quote Top Bottom Report

Thank you, Chad. I need to add some of these to my collection. 

Now...do they get listed here? The 1850s album cards mentioned in the first link certainly sound like trading cards to me, even if the advertising cards don't quite fit the guidelines. Of course, finding a checklist and perhaps even images of paper goods from the 1850s may prove impossible. 


-------------------------------

Collect for the love of the hobby!

Writer of Cardboard History  & Nothing But Nets | My COMC- most under 75 cents!

New Collection Website: Cardboard History Gallery Shows my entire collection in albums for each person, team and set (Still under construction)

Tips on how to make your scans look like the card does in hand (No more washed out, fuzzy scans!):

 

Aycee

Posts: 53
Joined: Jun 2017

Monday, March 11, 2019 3:19 PMReply Quote Top Bottom Report

I am Dutch and I can confirm it is Dutch. Ironically, I like the card but coffee makes me feel very sick. Love the smell though. Nevertheless, here's a quick translation of the back:

The ladies at home who cook a family soup appreciate very much the Liebig Bouillon block. One block is 1 litre of basic bouillon.

2. - Main species and how they are grown

One knows around 40 species of coffee beans of which two are very important in terms of agricultural usage: the Coffea Arabica and a species imported from the Kongo around the start of the century, the Coffea Robusta.

The coffee-tree, which can grow up to 10 meters, is cut frequently to just 2-3 meters to pick the beans more easily. The  image (on the front) depicts a part of the plantation, which has bundles of 4-5 plants which carry white Jasmin-smelling flowers. The flowers open in the morning and die out the same day. The next day this process repeats itself, which creates a magic September spring spectacle in Brazil. The coffee tree demands a lot of the soil and climate; it needs penetrable soil, mainly deposits from volcanic soil such as those of Sao Paulo in Brazil.

The temperature range that the coffee tree needs is 10 to 35 degrees Celsius. Rain and shadow are favourable, however a drought of 3-4 months is necessary. The Robusta however adapts easily to less suitable environments. One harvests the fruits of this species starting from the 3rd to 5th year after it has been planted. The planter must battle worms, insects, parasital fungae and must keep his land fertile. Because the coffee tree shall only produce rich harvests when it receives a rich amount of natural and 'artificial menure'

(not sure about the last two words :P)

 


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Bring back the Sonics!

Lea DeFoote

Posts: 803
Joined: Jul 2012

Monday, March 11, 2019 4:46 PMReply Quote Top Bottom Report

Nice, thanks for the translation!

'Artificial Manure' sounds like fertilizer to me.

-Tom


-------------------------------

Ted Musgrave card collection 98.5% Complete: Cards Known: 1010, Cards Owned: 995

Perfection is not a static state of being.

Billy Kingsley

Posts: 4608
Joined: Aug 2011

Monday, March 11, 2019 8:00 PMReply Quote Top Bottom Report

Thank you for the translation! 


-------------------------------

Collect for the love of the hobby!

Writer of Cardboard History  & Nothing But Nets | My COMC- most under 75 cents!

New Collection Website: Cardboard History Gallery Shows my entire collection in albums for each person, team and set (Still under construction)

Tips on how to make your scans look like the card does in hand (No more washed out, fuzzy scans!):

 

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